English

English

Within the English curriculum the emphasis is upon all aspects of communication – verbal, non-verbal and written – and the variety of ways in which thoughts and ideas may be shared.  We seek to encourage pupils’ understanding of themselves, our society, historical and multicultural issues.

The teaching of English at Glenwood endeavours to equip students for the literate world.  Pupils are encouraged to develop creativity and imagination, to express themselves effectively and work collaboratively; they are given access to literary genres which broaden their cultural experience and increase sensitivity about wider issues.

Pupils are provided with the necessary skills for proficient speaking and listening, and competent reading as well as how to use words effectively in written communication for different purposes and audiences.

The development of literacy underpins teaching and learning throughout the school.  Our curriculum complements the Social Use of Language Programme with its development of the pupils’ interpersonal and social abilities from a communication perspective.  Mathematical skills are also enhanced by the key words that are taught, such as the days of the week, months of the year, numbers and comparative language. 

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Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Year 7

An Introduction to English at Glenwood School   James and the Giant Peach    

Skellig     Superheroes and Villains 

The Tempest

Poetry 

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory   The Sixth Winner 

Anthropomorphism   Shields and Heraldry 

Year 8

George’s Marvellous Medicine     Catastrophe    

Oliver Twist

A Midsummer Night’s Dream  

Inventions    

Poetry   Speeches

Tuck Everlasting

Year 9

Magazines   

A Christmas Carol  

Macbeth

Introduction to Step Up Exploring

Power and Conflict Poetry  

Detectives 

Year 10

Media  

Leisure

Romeo and Juliet

Music Functional Skills

Gothic Horror

Fashion Functional Skills

Year 11

Heroism

Sport Functional Skills

The Next Step

Spoken Language and GCSE Revision / Step Up alternative Component / Functional Skills

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Cell

Glenwood School

English

 Within the English curriculum the emphasis is upon all aspects of communication – verbal, non-verbal and written – and the variety of ways in which thoughts and ideas may be shared.  We seek to encourage pupils’ understanding of themselves, our society, historical and multicultural issues.

The teaching of English at Glenwood endeavours to equip students for the literate world.  Pupils are encouraged to develop creativity and imagination, to express themselves effectively and work collaboratively; they are given access to literary genres which broaden their cultural experience and increase sensitivity about wider issues.

Pupils are provided with the necessary skills for proficient speaking and listening, and competent reading as well as how to use words effectively in written communication for different purposes and audiences.

The development of literacy underpins teaching and learning throughout the school.  Our curriculum complements the Social Use of Language Programme with its development of the pupils’ interpersonal and social abilities from a communication perspective.  Mathematical skills are also enhanced by the key words that are taught, such as the days of the week, months of the year, numbers and comparative language. 

Communication and Advocacy We empower student voice in English by providing many thought-provoking topics that may be discussed, debated and explored in a constructive way.  Pupils learn how to listen to others’ viewpoints and respond to what has been said – this may be by indicating whether they disagree or agree, or adding points which build upon previous ones.  Different roles are taken during a discussion so that everyone plays an equally important part in keeping the conversation going.
Independence and Preparing for Adulthood
Enabling literacy skills to be acquired in a meaningful way allows pupils to curiously explore what they think, feel and learn from other people’s experiences, which may influence the decisions they face in life.  By inspiring pupils to become lifelong readers, writers and speakers, we will help them to open up their minds to what the world has to offer.
Physical, Social and Emotional Good Health Building resilience, acknowledging one’s emotions and being aware of the thoughts, feelings and behaviours of others is all part of the learning process.   English provides the emotional vocabulary needed to help the pupils to manage and engage in social interactions.    Furthermore, texts studied allow the pupils to consider the relationships between characters and how disagreements are resolved to restore everyone’s sense of well-being.

KS4 Overview

Throughout Key Stage 4, students are working towards the Step Up to English Entry Level accreditation (as well as Functional Skills English and English Language GCSE if either or both are deemed appropriate).  Each Scheme of Work will enable to students to build, apply and master the nine Assessment Objectives for English language at the appropriate levels.  The aim is to enable students to build at least basic and relevant literacy skills in preparation for adulthood and to utilise in order to fully participate in school life and life beyond school.

In order to gain accreditation in the Step up to English award, students will complete at least 3 Non Exam Assessments.  Summative assessment of the NEAs (as well as ongoing formative assessment) will enable the teacher to track student progress, ascertain strengths and weaknesses in individual Assessment Objectives and plan for personalised intervention / learning paths.

English lessons cover the development of reading and comprehension; writing and spoken language as well as the explicit teaching of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

We also hope to foster a love of literature.  Students will experience a variety of text types; exploring their plot, characters, events and settings as well as the social, historical and cultural cultures which influenced them.  We want to give students the tools to be able to express their own personal response through the development of critical and literary terminology.

Aims and Learning Outcomes
 Autumn 1Autumn 2Spring 1Spring 2Summer 1Summer 2
Year 9      Introduction to the Media: Glamourzines   All students will:   Take part in group discussions and make an individual presentation   Study the front covers of a variety of magazines, looking at layout, colour, font style, photographs used, how they appeal to their target audience   Use the texts to learn how to infer, comment on language and structure and to compare ideas and express personal preferences   Design their own magazine cover labelling the stylistic choices they have made and explaining whyA Christmas Carol     All students will   Read an appropriate version of the novel   Watch an adaptation of the novelMacbeth     All students will:   Read an appropriately written (abridged) Shakespeare play   Watch a performance of the play   Take on the role of the director to direct a scene from the play   Use the texts to learn how to infer, comment on language and structure and to compare ideas and express personal preferences   Show understanding of the relationship between the text and contexts in which they were written  Exploring     All students will:   Read a selection of literary and literary non-fiction texts.   Use the texts to learn how to infer, comment on language and structure and to compare ideas and perspectives as well as to express personal preferences   Learn how plan, write, edit and proof read a story.Power and Conflict Poetry   All students will:   Read a variety of poems linked to the themes of power and conflict   Make choices about personal preferences   Use the texts to learn how to infer, comment on language and structure and to compare ideas and perspectives as well as to express personal preferences   Show understanding of the relationship between the text and contexts in which they were written  Detectives     All students will:    Take part in group discussions and make an individual presentation   Read a selection of non-fiction texts   Use the texts to learn how to infer, comment on language and structure and to compare ideas and perspectives as well as to express personal preferences   Learn how to plan, write, edit and proof read a piece of informative writing (report).
Year 10      Media Campaigns       All students will:   Take part in group discussions and make an individual presentation   Read a selection of non-fiction texts including advertising campaigns, newspaper articles, documentaries and scripts, investigate the Eat Well campaign   Use the texts to learn how to infer, comment on language and structure and to compare ideas and perspectives as well as to express personal preferences   Learn how to plan, write, edit and proof read a piece of informative writing (letter/schedule).Leisure   All students will:    Take part in group discussions and make an individual presentation   Read a selection of non-fiction texts (timetables, leaflets, reviews, web pages and surveys)   Use the texts to learn how to infer, comment on language and structure and to compare ideas and perspectives as well as to express personal preferences   Learn how to plan, write, edit and proof read a piece of informative writing (letter or review).Romeo and Juliet   All students will:   Read an appropriately written (abridged) Shakespeare play   Watch a performance of the play   Take on the role of the director to direct a scene from the play   Use the texts to learn how to infer, comment on language and structure and to compare ideas and express personal preferences   Show understanding of the relationship between the text and contexts in which they were written  Music   All students will:   Take part in group discussions and make an individual presentation.   Read a selection of non-fiction texts (timelines, magazines, factual books, factsheets).   Use the texts to learn how to infer, comment on language and structure and to compare ideas and express personal preferences   Learn how to plan, write, edit and proofread a piece of informative writing (letter or review).Gothic Horror   All students will:   Read a selection of literary and literary non-fiction texts from the gothic genre   Use texts to learn how to infer, comment on language and structure and to compare ideas and express personal preferences   Show understanding of the relationship between the text and contexts in which they were written   Learn how to plan, write, edit and proofread a story.Fashion   All students will:   Read a selection of literary and literary non-fiction texts relating to fashion including magazines, story extracts, autobiography, biography, plays and films.   Use the texts to learn how to infer, comment on language and structure and to compare ideas and perspectives as well as to express personal preferences   Learn how to plan, write, edit and proof read a story.
Year 11  Heroism   All students will:   Read a selection of literary and literary non-fiction texts linking to both human and animal heroes including Mary Seacole, Harriet Tubman, Thomas Barnado, Major Tom Moore   Use texts to learn how to infer, comment on language and structure and to compare ideas and express personal preferences   Show understanding of the relationship between the text and contexts in which they were written   Learn how plan, write, edit and proofread a story.Sport   All students will:   Read a selection of literary and literary non-fiction texts relating to sport   Use texts to learn how to infer, comment on language and structure and to compare ideas and express personal preferences   Show understanding of the relationship between the text and contexts in which they were written   Learn how to plan, write, edit and proofread a story.The Next Step   All students will:   Take part in group discussions and make an individual presentation.   Read a selection of non-fiction texts (newspaper / job centre / online job adverts, prospectuses, CV templates).   Use the texts to learn how to infer, comment on language and structure and to compare ideas and express personal preferences   Learn how to plan, write, edit and proofread a piece of informative writing (application form).Spoken Language and GCSE Revision / Step Up alternative Component / Functional Skills   Students will:   Study a selection of 20th and 21st century non-fiction and literary non-fiction texts – whole texts or extracts.   Write a variety of texts for differing audiences and purposes   Complete practice papers for English language GCSE / Functional Skills 

SULP

Language and communication skills are taught explicitly in SULP with the aim of improving social competence.  It is a programme devised by speech and language therapists that not only facilitates, endorses and assists pupils to use non-verbal communication, verbal expertise and conversational skills, but also aids the acquisition of social understanding needed to recognise others’ needs.  An ability to communicate well is essential to learning; therefore, we ensure that pupils learn the rules of clear and effective communication in order for them to succeed.  The importance of social communication is taught through a blend of conversation, discussion, role-play and social skill games.  Opportunities for practising, consolidating and advancing these skills are afforded in English and Drama lessons as well as in all other subject areas.   Upon completion, pupils apply skills learnt to a broader learning context as they embark upon the education of life.

 Autumn 1Autumn 2Spring 1Spring 2Summer 1Summer 2
  Year 7  Non-Verbal Communication Skills – eye contact, facial and hand gestures (an awareness of those used in different cultures)

Social Niceties: Positive Body Language and Polite Expressions – polite phrases, positive body language          
Prosody: Volume identifying, selecting and using suitable volume levels for different situations   Pair/Group Work good sharing, turn-taking (handing over communication, waiting for a response), appropriate volume   Proxemics – appropriate distance for communication, personal space, touching behavioursListening Skills – levels of listening, posture, using suitable facial expressions, asking appropriate questions, using/ responding to interjections and head-nodding (non-verbal cues), staying focussed  Prosody: Speaking Skills – identifying, selecting and using suitable rate, volume, pitch and intonation for different situations; identifying,  Memory – short-term memory and long-term memory, developing techniques for improving memory    Teamwork- identifying what makes a good team, developing, identifying and using verbal and non-verbal communication skills that allow teams to succeed  
  Year 8      Self-Awareness
Self-Esteem  –
developing self-esteem, becoming self-aware, communicating in an assertive way
Social Communication and Other Awareness – interest and friendship strategies, strengths and weakness

   
Conversational Skills – starting communications, taking turns, timings of turns, handing over conversations allowing for response, thinking time, sorting crashes/repairing conversationsFocussed Listening – listeningskills used in everyday communicative contexts  Social Context – meeting new people, strategies to follow instructions and take messages, asking helps, comprehension monitoringSocial Context – negotiating compromise, dealing with potentially harmful situations, dealing with constructive criticism  

Glenwood School

Social Use of Language Programme

Language and communication skills are taught explicitly in SULP with the aim of improving social competence.  It is a programme devised by speech and language therapists that not only facilitates, endorses and assists pupils to use non-verbal communication, verbal expertise and conversational skills, but also aids the acquisition of social understanding needed to recognise others’ needs.  An ability to communicate well is essential to learning; therefore, we ensure that pupils learn the rules of clear and effective communication in order for them to succeed.  The importance of social communication is taught through a blend of conversation, discussion, role-play and social skill games.  Opportunities for practising, consolidating and advancing these skills are afforded in English and Drama lessons as well as in all other subject areas.   Upon completion, pupils apply skills learnt to a broader learning context as they embark upon the education of life.

Communication and Advocacy We provide the strategies needed for the pupils to express their ideas and opinions with clarity, listen carefully to others’ viewpoints – to which they learn how to respond in a considerate manner and empathetic way – as well as how to read and use body language effectively to ensure meaningful communication takes place. 
Independence and Preparing for Adulthood By ensuring the pupils are aware of the meaning of non-verbal cues, know when people are making jokes, how to resolve conflicts and recognise appropriate responses, we allow our pupils to interact with others in a mature, safe and independent way, which is fundamental to becoming considerate citizens.  
Physical, Social and Emotional Good Health Providing the pupils with the ability to socially interact in appropriate ways, means disagreements, frustrations and misconceptions about actions and words used (by either themselves or others) may be avoided and/or resolved, ergo permitting more positive relationships to form.  Staying physically healthy in order to be emotionally heathy is advocated.  

Glenwood School – Values in our Curriculum

English

  • RESPECT

  • INTEGRITY

  • TEAMWORK

  • EVERYONE VALUED

  • CELEBRATE

  • INCLUSIVE

Where you will see it in my subject

– We listen carefully to each other’s ideas.
– We respond in a positive and kind way to what has been said, or done.  
– If we disagree with something, we put forward our point of view in a polite way.  
– Praising thoughtful comments made and/or written shows we appreciate each other’s views/achievements.
– From the way the characters react to one another in books, we can infer how they feel about each other.
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