A new generation remembers

 

 

In March 2018, two pupils and a teacher from Glenwood School joined representatives from several other schools from S-E England on a four-day tour of WW1’s Western Front.  We were one of approximately 4000 secondary schools to have participated in this programme over four years to help young people more fully understand the scale of WW1 along the Western Front, raise awareness of The Great War and how it should be remembered 100 years on.  In addition, each day we had a focus question.

Sunday 4th March  

The coach arrived at Glenwood School, the pick-up point for Portsmouth and Havant schools, at 8am to collect the first group of pupils and teachers before travelling to Ashford, Kent via other pick-up points, arriving at Kingswood Activity Centre where we were shown to our rooms, met the rest of the group and had some team building activities.

Later, we learnt about what we would be doing during the tour and then looked at weaponry and artefacts from WW1.  What started as a war with basic weapons, including horses and cavalry charges with swords, became a war of attrition and mass slaughter as it developed into the world’s first mechanised war with machine guns, tanks, planes and battleships.

 

Horses were used by both sides of the war.

Horses were used by both sides of the war.  The British army used over 1,000,000 horses of which 400,000 were killed during the war and many more killed after the war due to their poor condition.  Of 130,000 horses from Australia only one, named Stanley, returned to Australia.  At the Battle of Verdun, 7000 horses were killed on one day.

 

Horses were used to carry ammunition, food, wood, medical supplies, pull wagons and guns etc. and were also used for cavalry charges. They were essential tools of war. (Flanders Museum)

Horses were used to carry ammunition, food, wood, medical supplies, pull wagons and guns etc. and were also used for cavalry charges. They were essential tools of war. (Flanders Museum)

 

On the Western Front, barbed wire and machine guns helped ensure that advances were measured in yards rather than miles and always at huge cost in lives on both sides often with the same piece of land being fought over several times.  To illustrate that the front line did not move significantly during WW1, the first British soldier to be killed, John Parr (died 21st August 1914), and the last British soldier to be killed, George Edwin Ellison (died 11th November 1918) are buried in the same cemetery near Mons on the France / Belgium border; after four years of fighting and hundreds of thousands of deaths on the Western Front, neither side had made significant gains, ending the war virtually in the same place they had started.

Hell is not fire…Hell is mud

Le Bochofage, a French newspaper,  wrote in March 1916 that “Hell is not fire … Hell is mud.”

The shelling completely destroyed the drainage system in Flanders, a very flat area, so the water eventually turned the whole battlefield into a filthy, rat-infested swamp.  In addition, in 1917 Ypres had the wettest autumn for 75 years, and the Battle of Passchendaele (31st July – 10th November 1917) is remembered for the mud with thousands of soldiers and horses drowning in water filled craters.

Soon after the start of the war, trenches began to appear as the only way to protect the soldiers from shelling and machine guns; in total, some 25,000 miles of trenches were dug along the Western Front, enough to circle our planet.  Separating the warring sides was barbed wire, originally invented in the USA for herding cattle but here used as a weapon of war.  In total some 3,000,000 miles of barbed wire was used, the distance to the Moon and back six times.

During the visit, we could see that from the point of view of the Germans, they thought the Western Front to be their new border so they prepared excellent, almost permanent, defences often on higher, usually drier ground which was easier to defend, as they thought they would need to defend their new ‘border’ for many years. However, the  British strategy was about attacking and pushing the Germans back to Germany and so their trenches were more temporary and less well made. Because the Germans arrived first, they had picked the best land so the British were left to dig their trenches in the lower, poorly drained, wetter, muddier, harder to defend areas and as the war dragged on, mud became as much the enemy as the Germans.

Simon,, the course leader tells the group what will be happening during the tour

Simon, the course leader, tells the group what will be happening during the tour.

An early WW1 rifle

An early WW1 rifle.  The bolt sometimes caught the soldiers’ fingers causing some nasty and potentially infected injuries.

Wire cutters used for cutting barbed wire

Wire cutters used for cutting barbed wire.  Often three soldiers had to work together; one to cut the wire using some sacking to muffle the sound, and a soldier either side to hold the wire so it didn’t’ spring back and make a noise or the Germans would fire their machine guns.

Battle of the duvet cover

Battle of the duvet cover!

 

We also learnt to use the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website to locate fallen soldiers from Emsworth.  We located Second Lieutenant R.G.W. Gillham who lived in Southleigh Road, Emsworth and he has an inscription on a wall, along with 44,000 other names of those with no known grave, at Tyne Cot, near Passchendaele.

Monday 5th March:

FOCUS QUESTION:  How did the First World war affect ordinary people?

An early start saw us heading through the Channel Tunnel and to Lijssenthoek Cemetery where we learnt about this huge, 4000 bed field hospital. It took approximately one day for a soldier wounded in the trenches to get to the hospital which was located here due to the vicinity of the railway line.  We learnt from a RAF helicopter pilot about the ‘Golden Hour’ in modern warfare; the time taken to get a casualty from the battlefield to hospital to improve the chance of survival.  Unusually for a war cemetery, almost every grave has a name as most soldiers who came here had some identification so if they died, the grave could be marked. 

Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery contains 10,785 graves of which just 35 are unnamed.

We learnt about Fabian Ware, a foresighted British officer who saw the need to ensure the sacrifice of hundreds of thousands of service personnel was suitably recorded and, if possible, the bodies identified and buried with their fallen comrades.  This monumental task led to the creation of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, which now has responsibility for remembering 1.7 million men and women who have died in the service of Britain and the Commonwealth in 23,000 locations in 150 countries around the world. 

Fabian Ware, whose work helped ensure that the soldiers who gave their lives would never be forgotten.

Fabian Ware, whose work helped ensure that the soldiers who gave their lives would never be forgotten.  (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Prior to WW1 British soldiers killed abroad e.g. at the Battle of Waterloo were usually buried in mass graves or cremated on huge fires, mainly to stop the spread of disease, and then often forgotten. Those that were buried in a proper grave were frequently dug up by locals once the British army had left, to rob the graves and remove all traces of ‘the enemy’.  During WW1, Fabian Ware and his small team working in dreadful conditions, removing bodies and parts of bodies from battlefields, sometimes under fire, changed the way the British people and the Government remembered the fallen.

Click here to see Prowse Point cemetery

Proswe Point cemetery is the only cemetery to be named after a soldier, Major Charles Prowse, who was killed on the first day of the Battle of The Somme.  There are four CWGC cemeteries in this small area of just a few fields where hundreds of soldiers on both sides died.  Listen to the birds singing and contrast this to the terrible conditions 100 years ago.

Planning for cemeteries was well advanced by the end of the war with staff from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew visiting the Western Front to decide on suitable plants which would grow in the soil and climate but also, where possible represent the nations where the dead soldiers came from.  For example, at Tyne Cot, thousands of English roses have been planted so wherever the sun shines, the shadow of an English rose will fall across every English soldiers’ grave.

An aspect of the war cemeteries of both sides is that they survived largely intact during the horrors of WW2.  Whilst there are few German cemeteries, there are dozens of CWGC cemeteries in this area  The German High Command issued a directive to its troops ordering them not to damage British cemeteries so apart from some relatively minor damage to The Menin Gate from rifle fire and shell damage and damage to some other cemeteries, the fighting of WW2 largely by-passed them.

Learning about the 'Golden Hour' in evacuating wounded personnel.

Learning about the ‘Golden Hour’ in evacuating wounded personnel from a RAF helicopter pilot.

 

Each post shows the number of soldiers who died at Lijssenthoek on a particular day.

Each post shows the number of soldiers who died at Lijssenthoek on a particular day. As it took 24 hours to reach the hospital from the front line, it illustrates the extent of the fighting on the previous day. Some posts had over 100 notches .

There is post for every day of the war.

There is post for every day of the war.

The grave of Private Donald Snaddon, aged 15

The grave of Private Donald Snaddon, aged 15

 

 

Click here to find out more about Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s website 

Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery

Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery. It contains the grave of Nurse Nellie Spindler killed at the Battle of Passchendaele – one of only two women buried in Belgium, the Canadian Major General Malcolm Mercer – one of the highest ranking officers to be killed in WW1 and Private Donald Snaddon, aged 15, the youngest soldier in the cemetery. (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)


We then moved onto Passchendaele Memorial Museum.  

Passchendaele Memorial Museum

Outside the museum.  Here we learnt about the trenches and how weapons developed as the war progressed and some aspects of what is like for the ordinary soldier.

Walking through reconstructed trenches.

Walking through reconstructed trenches.  In reality, the trenches were often muddy and rat infested.  Because the land may have been fought over several times, sometimes bones and even corpses from previous battles could be seen in the sides of the trenches.

German machine gun post. The German machine gun posts were well fortified.

German machine gun post. The German machine gun posts were well fortified.

Selection of machine guns used in WW1.

Selection of machine guns used in WW1. Machine guns could fire 600 rounds a minute over approximately one mile. The Germans were expert machine gunners. Many soldiers died seconds after leaving their trenches.

 

Cross-section through Passchendaele. The red shapes indicate the approximate lines of German concrete machine gun posts built at the beginning of the war; remember the Germans got here first and so were able to plan their defences long before the British and their allies arrived. As a line of bunkers were captured, the Germans simply retreated to the next line of bunkers and so the fighting would continue. This helps explain why British and allied forces lost so many soldiers over relatively small areas when attacking fortified sites such as Passchendaele and the Somme.

Cross-section through Passchendaele. The red shapes indicate the approximate lines of German concrete machine gun posts built at the beginning of the war; remember the Germans got here first and so were able to plan their defences long before the British and their allies arrived. As a line of bunkers were captured, the Germans simply retreated to the next line of bunkers and so the fighting would continue. This helps explain why British and allied forces lost so many soldiers over relatively small areas when attacking fortified sites such as Passchendaele and the Somme.

 

Remains of fortifications can be found throughout Flanders.

Remains of fortifications can be found throughout Flanders.

 

Remains of fortifications can be found throughout Flanders.

Remains of fortifications can be found throughout Flanders.

 

On 7th June 1917, a series of huge mines exploded under the German lines at the Battle of the Messine Ridge. The explosions were heard in Britain. In this CWGC cemetery, Voormezeele Enclosure No. 3, all the graves have the same date; 7th June 1917.

On 7th June 1917, a series of huge mines exploded under the German lines at the Battle of the Messine Ridge. The explosions were heard in Britain. In this CWGC cemetery, Voormezeele Enclosure No. 3, many of the graves are dated 7th June – 14th June 1917.  Many of these soldiers would have witnessed the greatest man-made explosions.

 

The grave of Private William Darnell.  Died 7th June 1917.  Voormezelee Enclosure No.3.

The grave of Private William Darnell.  Died 7th June 1917.  Voormezelee Enclosure No.3.

 

The grave of Private J Furfey. Died 7th June 1917. Voormezeele Enclosure No.3

The grave of Private J Furfey. Died 7th June 1917. Voormezeele Enclosure No.3

 

The Spanbroekmolen Crater, one of many huge water filled craters which destroyed the German fortifications on 7th June 1917. It is approximately 76 metres across (250 ft) and 12 metres deep (40 ft).

The Spanbroekmolen Crater, one of many huge water filled craters which destroyed the German fortifications on the Messine Ridge on 7th June 1917. It is approximately 76 metres across (250 ft) and 12 metres deep (40 ft).  Coal-miners constructed tunnels under the German lines and filled them with hundreds of tonnes of explosives.  This was incredibly dangerous work.  19 mines exploded but three failed to explode. One of these mines exploded a few years ago when lightening hit the ground but the location of the remaining two mines is unknown.

 

One of the German machine gun bunkers destroyed by a Messine Ridge mine.

One of the German machine gun bunkers destroyed by a Messine Ridge mine.

 

In the evening we went to the Menin Gate inscribed with the names of 54,896 British and Commonwealth soldiers with no known grave.  This memorial was built after the war ended, marking the road to the front line through which most of the soldiers destined for the trenches near Ieper (Ypres) passed.  Every night at 8pm the local fire brigade play the Last Post in memory of the fallen. Ieper was of major importance in the war and five major battles were fought nearby, including Passchendaele.

Afterwards we went to a shop selling Belgium chocolate!

Click here to find out more about The Menin Gate at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s website

The road to the Western Front

The road to the Western Front. The Menin Gate in the distance was built to commemorate the soldiers who passed along this road and did not return. It has inscribed the names of 54,000 soldiers who have no known grave.

The Menin Gate

The Menin Gate. Soldiers killed before 14th August 1917 had their names inscribed here and after this date the names were inscribed at Tyne Cot.

represenatives of the local Fire Brigade

Members of the Belgium Fire Brigade preparing to play The Last Post.

The Menin Gate

The Menin Gate contains 54,896 names of soldiers with no known grave, many of whom simply disappeared into the water-filled shell-holes.

Looking at some of the names.

Looking at some of the names of ‘The Missing”.

The Chocolate Shop

The Chocolate Shop

The Menin Gate, Ieper (Ypres) © Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

The Menin Gate, Ieper (Ypres) © Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Throughout the Western Front there are many of these green signs indicating a CWGC cemetery. The land of the cemeteries has been given to Britain by the French and Belgium governments.

Throughout the Western Front, bodies are still being discovered.

Throughout the Western Front, bodies are still being discovered.           (In Flanders Fields Museum, Ieper)

Throughout the Western Front, bodies are still being discovered.

Throughout the Western Front, bodies are still being discovered.                (In Flanders Fields Museum, Ieper)

The inscription above The Menin Gate reads

“AD MAJOREM DEI GLORIUM – HERE ARE RECORDED THE NAMES OF OFFICERS AND MEN WHO FELL IN THE YPRES SALIENT, BUT TO WHOM THE FORTUNE OF WAR DENIED THE KNOWN AND HONOURED BURIAL GIVEN TO THEIR COMRADES IN DEATH.”

The Latin phrase means ‘To the greater glory of God’.

Click here to see a clip of Ieper, the Menin Gate and the Road to The Western Front

Near Ieper is the site of a Christmas truce. Christmas 1914

Near Ieper is the site of a 1914 Christmas truce. British and German soldiers played football, exchanged gifts and collected their dead. Once over, the killing continued. Senior officers on both sides prevented such truces happening again.

Football fans often leave football-related items. The trenches here have been completely filled in.

Football fans often leave football-related items. The trenches here have been completely filled in.

Returning to our focus question: How did the war affect ordinary people?, it appears to be highly likely that no community in the British Isles was left untouched by the war.  In 1914, Emsworth was a small town with a population of approximately 2,500.  Assuming the average family size at this time was between 5-6 i.e. two parents and 3-4 children* then this equates to approximately 450 families living in Emsworth, several of whom would be closely related and given 135 residents of Emsworth were killed in the fighting during WW1, then approximately one third of the families lost a family member.  In addition, given how close knit communities were 100 years ago, most families, if not every family would have been affected many times by the loss of a family member be it a son, father, uncle, cousin or nephew or the loss of neighbours, friends or work colleagues during the duration of the war.

There are over 77,000 war memorials in the United Kingdom (Imperial War Museum’s register of war memorials) and they are now an established feature of our villages, towns and cities.

*A Century of Change in Trends in UK Statistics since 1900, House of Commons Research Paper, 1999

Tuesday 6th March: 

FOCUS QUESTION: Was the Battle of The Somme in 1916 really a disaster for the British Army?

Today we travelled to France to learn about the Battle of The Somme, the first day of which was the bloodiest day in the history of the British Army with 57,940 casualties including 19,240 killed, most of whom died in the first hour.  The British Army did not want to have the battle so early but due to the high probability of the destruction of the French Army at Verdun, it was decided that the Battle of The Somme was brought forward to draw German troops away from Verdun and in doing so, helped save what was left of the French Army in that area and ensure that France did not fall.

Our first stop was Beaumont-Hamel, a preserved battlefield where we learnt about the tactics used by the British and Commonwealth armies.  Following a two-week barrage of millions of shells on the German lines, the British and Commonwealth commanders mistakenly believed the German defenses had been destroyed.  However, by the time of the Battle of The Somme in 1916 the German Army had already occupied this land for two years; plenty of time to know how best to defend it and also build extremely effective concrete machine gun posts and concrete bunkers, many up to 15 metres underground, which were largely untouched by the shelling.  In addition, the shelling did not cut the barbed wire, but possibly worse, made it even more tangled.  The British commanders did not know they were sending their troops to almost certain death and because of poor communication and limited intelligence from the battlefield they were unable to adapt their battleplan and so wave after wave of soldiers were sent to their deaths.

 

Looking at a map of the battlefield.

Arriving at Beaumont -Hamel,a battlefield fought over by troops from Newfoundland, now part of Canada. This is a map of the battlefield. Our tour was selected to be filmed by UCL for a documentary about the Legacy 110 project.

 

Our guide tells us about the battlefield.

Bob, our guide, a former Royal Marine and Falkland’s veteran talks about Beaumont-Hamel and the Newfoundland Regiment.

 

German front line.

The German front line. 15 metres below are concrete bunkers that allowed the Germans to withstand two weeks of continuous shelling.

 

The site may still have unexploded ammunition.

The site may still have unexploded ammunition.

 

Newfoundland Memorial

Newfoundland Memorial at Beaumont-Hamel.  The Newfoundland Regiment was almost entirely wiped out.

 

Hawthorne Ridge Cemetery

Hawthorne Ridge Cemetery. Studying the map shows we are very close to Sunken Lane and the Thievpal Memorial.  Hawthorne Ridge was the scene of a massive explosion which was filmed by the news reporter, Geoffrey Malins.

 

Click here to find out more about Beaumont-Hamel Cemetery at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s website.

The 51st (Highland) Division Memorial. There are several cemeteries and memorials at Beaumont-Hamel.

The 51st (Highland) Division Memorial. There are several cemeteries and memorials at Beaumont-Hamel.

We also visited Sunken Lane, made famous by a news reporter, Geoffery Mallins, who photographed the 1st Lancashire Fusiliers preparing to ‘go over the top’.  Here we walked in their footsteps and saw how quickly they were killed by German machine guns about 1000m away.  The bombardment of the German lines stopped at 07:20.  The Germans knew then that an attack was likely, came out of their deeply buried concrete bunkers and set up their machine guns so when, at 07:30 the order for the 1st Lancashire Fusiliers to attack was given,  the machine gunners opened fire killing most of the British soldiers in seconds.  The Lancashire Fusiliers are buried in this field.

Hawthorne Ridge explosion

Bottom right photograph; the trees on the skyline are the site of the massive Hawthorne Ridge explosion, one of a series of explosions heard as far away as London.  The photographs on the left and top right are soldiers of the 1st Lancashire Fusiliers waiting in Sunken Lane.

Sunken Lane

Standing in Sunken Lane where soldiers of the 1st Lancashire Fusiliers waited. Shortly after these photos were taken, most of them lay dead or dying.

Relatives of the fallen still visit Sunken Lane.

Relatives of the fallen still visit Sunken Lane.

Bob, out guide talks about going into battle.

Bob, our guide, a former Royal Marine and Falkland’s veteran, tells us what it is like to go into battle and how the soldiers may have tried to keep themselves calm.  Sunken Lane is on the left of the photograph and we are standing where the 1st Lancashire Fusiliers died.

Avril's Tea Room

Lunch at Avril’s Tea Room.

Behind the cafe is a WW1 trench which we explored.

Behind the cafe is a WW1 trench which we explored.

 

 

 

We then moved onto Caterpillar Valley Cemetery, one of dozens of WW1 cemeteries in this area of France.  Here we studied the headstones to help understand how a battle was able to continue, initially using troops from different parts of Britain followed by troops from different parts of the Commonwealth.  It was from here that a New Zealand solider was exhumed and laid to rest in Tomb of the Unknown Warrior, at the National War Memorial, Wellington, New Zealand.

Caterpillar Valley Cemetery

Caterpillar Valley Cemetery

Caterpillar Valley Cemetery

Caterpillar Valley Cemetery

There are soldiers from many different countries buried in Caterpillar Valley Cemetery.

There are soldiers from many different countries buried in Caterpillar Valley Cemetery showing how as one nation’s soldiers were killed, reinforcements from another country were brought in to continue the battle with the Germans.

The Metal Harvest - thousands of shells are still found every year. They are left by the roadside by farmers for the local Police to collect. Some tractors have armour plating to protect against an explosion.

The Iron Harvest – thousands of shells are still found every year. Farmers leave them by the roadside for the local Police to collect. Some tractors have armour plating to protect against an explosion.

 

 

Click here to find out more about Caterpillar Valley cemetery from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s website

The unknown soldier in this grave is now in the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior, at the National War Memorial, Wellington, New Zealand.

The soldier in this grave was chosen to be returned to New Zealand. He is one of over 1600 unknown New Zealand soldiers buried in Caterpillar Valley Cemetery. His body now lies in the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior, at the National War Memorial, Wellington, New Zealand. (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

 

Our visit to The Battle of The Somme concluded with a visit to the huge Thiepval Memorial, built on a site which saw particularly fierce fighting and has inscribed the names of 72,194 soldiers of British and South African forces who have no known grave.

The Battle of The Somme: The bloodiest day of the British Army

The Battle of The Somme: The bloodiest day of the British Army

 

The Thiepval Memorial is built on a hill, the site of particularly fierce fighting.

The Thiepval Memorial is built on a hill, the site of particularly fierce fighting.

The Thiepval Memorial

The Thiepval Memorial

The Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of The Somme

The Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of The Somme

 

Click here to find out more about the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of The Somme at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s website

The Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of The Somme. The battle started on 1st July 1916 and finished on 18th November 1916. In total, over three million soldiers fought for 141 days with over one million killed, wounded or missing making this one of the bloodiest battles in history.

The Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of The Somme commemorating 72,194 British and South African soldiers with no known grave.  (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

In the evening we learnt about equipment, rations and clothing worn by troops during WW1 and today’s troops.  The long coat worn by British soldiers was quite impractical for wet weather as it soaked up the water and became very heavy to wear.

An early WW1 gas mask.

An early WW1 gas mask was very hot to wear and the goggles steamed up so it was difficult to see where you were going.

Equipment carried during WW1 by British troops.

Equipment carried by British troops during WW1.

The British winter coat.

The long coat worn by British soldiers soaked up the water and dragged in the mud.

Modern British uniform.

Modern British uniform.

Protective chemical weapons clothing

Modern protective chemical weapons clothing

Modern chemical weapons clothing.

Modern protective chemical weapons clothing.

 

 

 

We also talked about our focus question: Was the Battle of The Somme in 1916 really a disaster for the British Army?  There were different opinions about the Battle of The Somme, particularly the first day.  We need to remember that the Battle of The Somme was never meant to start when it did; the attack was brought forward to assist the French Army which was under incredible pressure at Verdun and if Verdun fell then there was a danger that France would fall as well.

By starting the Battle of The Somme early, German forces had to leave Verdun and move to The Somme and so the French Army was then better able to defend the city and possibly save France.  Also, the commanders of the British and Commonwealth troops did not really know what they were up against as this was a battle on a scale that up until then was beyond the experience of the commanders and, with limited information from the battlefield they were unable to adapt their battle plan to cope with changing circumstances.  The commanders learnt important lessons from the Battle of The Somme that eventually helped defeat the Germans.

Wednesday 6th March: 

FOCUS QUESTION: Is remembrance more or less important 100 years on?

The first part of the day was spent at the Coming World Remember Me workshop.  The workshop is part of a commemoration art programme similar to the Tower of London Poppies project.  Every pupil from the four thousand schools from England that have taken part in these visits created a pottery figure which will form part of a memorial to the 600,000 killed in Flanders in WW1.

Making the clay figure.

Making the clay figure.

600,000 figures will be made and go on display throughout Europe.

600,000 figures will be made and go on display throughout Europe.

All 8000 pupils who have taken part in the visits to the Western front have made a clay model.

All 8000 pupils who have taken part in the visits to the Western front have made a clay model.

Completed models ready for the kiln.

Completed models ready for the kiln.

 

 

We then moved onto Langemark Cemetery, a WW1 German cemetery.  There is a total of 44,294 bodies buried here, about half of which are unidentified.

The grass area is a mass grave containing about 24,000 bodies.

The grass area is a mass grave containing about 24,000 bodies.  It is called The Comrades’ Grave.

The inscription reads "I call your name and now you are mine."

The inscription reads “I call your name and now you are mine.”

Concrete machine gun posts from WW1 form part of the cemetery.

Concrete machine gun posts from WW1 form part of the cemetery.

Under each stone is the remains of eight German soldiers.

Under each stone is the remains of eight German soldiers.  This cemetery is very different from CWGC cemeteries with rows of white Portland stone headstones, each containing one body, even if unidentified.

Thousands of names are inscribed on metal blocks.

Thousands of names are inscribed on oak panels

Standing in Hitler's steps. Adolf Hitler came through this gate during WW2 when he visited Langemark Cemetery.

Standing in Hitler’s steps. Adolf Hitler came through this gate in 1940 when he visited Langemark Cemetery.

 

 

 

Two British soldiers are buried in the German Military Cemetery, Langemark.

Two British soldiers are buried in the German Military Cemetery, Langemark. In death, soldiers often treated the bodies of their enemy respectfully. In many CWGC cemeteries there are also graves of German soldiers. (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

 

German soldiers buried in a British cemetery.

German soldiers buried in a British cemetery.

 

German soldiers buried in a British cemetery.

German soldiers buried in a British cemetery.

 

French and British soldiers fought side by side. Here a British soldier is buried in a French cemetery. Notice the green CWGC sign.

The Esquelbec Military Cemetery is located in a small French cemetery near Calais, the Notre Dame cemetery.  French and British soldiers fought side by side. Here a British soldier is buried with French soldiers. Notice the green CWGC sign.

 

French and British soldiers fought side by side. Here a British soldier is buried in a French cemetery.

French and British soldiers fought side by side. Here a British soldier is buried in a French cemetery.

Our final visit was to the largest Commonwealth cemetery in the world, Tyne Cot, also called the Silent City due to the huge numbers commemorated here, with 11,954 graves of which about 7,000 are unknown and simply say ‘ A Soldier of the Great War.  Known unto God’.  In addition, there are over 34,000 names on the Memorial to the Missing carved onto a stone panel 150 metres in length.  The stone panel has the following inscription:

1914 – HERE ARE RECORDED THE NAMES OF OFFICERS AND MEN OF THE ARMIES OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE WHO FELL IN YPRES SALIENT, BUT TO WHOM THE FORTUNE OF WAR DENIED THE KNOWN AND HONOURED BURIAL GIVEN TO THEIR COMRADES IN DEATH – 1918

Once this area was captured the largest blockhouse / pillbox became a field dressing station and when injured soldiers died they were buried here.  After the war ended, soldiers buried in the surrounding area were exhumed and reburied here, eventually making this the CWGC’s largest cemetery in the world.  The cemetery includes several more blockhouses which are still in remarkably good condition, an indication of just how well constructed were the Germans defences and the huge sacrifice necessary to capture them.

Click here to see a clip of a German bunker and some of the 12,000 graves at Tyne Cot

The Great Cross of Sacrifice was built over a German blockhouse after a suggestion by King George V during a visit in 1922.  We located Second Lieutenant R.G.W. Gillham’s inscription at Tyne Cot. Previously, he lived in Southleigh Road, Emsworth.  His name is also on the War Memorial in Emsworth.

Every one of the 4000 schools of this programme has been able to find the name of a local soldier killed during WW1 at Tyne Cot, showing that no part of the country was untouched by the war.

The Great Cross of Sacrifice was built over a German blockhouse, part of which can be seen - the grey circle.

The Great Cross of Sacrifice was built over a German blockhouse, part of which can be seen – the grey circle.

The inscription of Second Lieutant R.G.W. Gillham at Tyne Cot. Previously, he lived in Southleigh Road, Emsworth.

The inscription of Second Lieutenant Reginald George William Gillham at Tyne Cot. Previously, he lived in Southleigh Road, Emsworth.  His name is also on the War Memorial in Emsworth.  He was only 22 when he died.

Visitors leave crosses and wreathes for fallen relatives.

Visitors leave crosses and wreathes for fallen relatives.

The Stone of Remembrance

The Stone of Remembrance is a feature of most of the British and Commonwealth military cemeteries and memorials and shows that there are at least 500 graves in the cemetery.
The words carved on every Stone of Remembrance, “Their Name Liveth For Evermore”, were suggested by Rudyard Kipling. The phrase is taken from Ecclesiasticus, Chapter 44, verse 14: “Their bodies are buried in peace; but their name liveth for evermore”.  Rudyard Kipling’s son, John was killed at the Battle of Loos; his body was never found.

Our final meeting before departure for the UK.

Before we left, Simon spoke about the aims of the tour, we talked about what we had seen and learnt and what we hoped to do when we got back to school to let others know about the importance of ensuring we never forget the sacrifice made 100 years ago.

Second Lieutenant Reginald George William Gillham of Southleigh Road, Emsworth

Second Lieutenant Reginald George William Gillham of Southleigh Road, Emsworth

 

 

King George V visits Tyne Cot in 1922. Notice the wooden crosses. The white Portland stone headstones did not start appearing for several years.

King George V visits Tyne Cot in 1922. Notice the wooden crosses. The white Portland stone headstones did not start appearing for several years. (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Tyne Cot Cemetery (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Tyne Cot Cemetery (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Tyne Cot Cemetery with The Great Cross of Sacrifice (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Tyne Cot Cemetery with The Great Cross of Sacrifice (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Tyne Cot Memorial and Graves (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Tyne Cot Memorial and Graves (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Centenary of The Battle of Passchendaele (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Centenary of The Battle of Passchendaele, July 2017 (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Tyne Cot Memorial (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Tyne Cot Memorial (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Click here to find out more about Tyne Cot Memorial from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s website

Click here to find out more about Tyne Cot Cemetery from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s website

Before we left for our coaches and the return to the UK, Bob read the following:

The final reading

There is something sacred about a battlefield.  Often it is a place where history has changed course, like the point on a long march, where the compass needle is consulted and a new bearing set.  But greater than historical significance is the human element.  It is the place where men have died – for it has been mostly men – en masse and in the prime of their youth and strength.

Soldiers don’t fight for history, rarely for country and certainly not for governments. they fight because their regiment places them in harm’s way and their regiment is family.  They fight for their mates.  In the last stand, they fight for their lives.  It is the individual stories of courage that touch us and sanctify the spot.

A battlefield is sacred because it is the point in time and space where soldiers confronted the most intimate of demons and angels.  It is the place where, however frightened, they mustered all that they were and faced death.

Major Nigel Price (Falklands veteran)

7th Duke of Edinburgh’s Own Gurkha Rifles

 

 

Tyne Cot - 100 years on (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Tyne Cot: Remembering relatives 100 years on (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

For the Fallen

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

(Laurence Binyon, September 1914)

 

The Unknown Warrior               “They buried him among the Kings”

At the end of the war many families wanted their dead relatives returned to Britain but only the very wealthy could afford to do this.  The Government believed that all the fallen should be treated the same regardless of rank or family wealth and buried near where they fell alongside their comrades.  It would also be almost impossible to return all the bodies as there would be thousands of dead soldiers returning for many years, requiring special ships and trains, with local cemeteries likely to run out of space as well as being bad for morale in post-war Britain with, what would seem to be, a never ending number of funerals.

However, this did not help the families as they had no grave in their local cemetery to visit, assuming the body had been found and identified.  The question was, how could people mourn their loss?  The Reverend David Railton had the idea of one UNKNOWN soldier representing ALL the dead when he saw a simple wooden cross on a battlefield saying “An Unknown British Soldier”.

To choose an UNKNOWN British soldier, teams of soldiers, who did not know why they were were doing this very unpleasant task, were sent to the major battlefields to exhume (dig up) the remains of four unknown British soldiers.  The battlefields chosen were the Somme, Ypres (includes Passchendaele), Arras and the Aisne.  The bones of these soldiers were placed in sacks and taken to a French church.  This was all done in the strictest secrecy and no paper records were kept.

Once in the church, the sacks were laid on separate tables.  A British officer, Brigadier-General Wyatt, who was blindfolded, placed his hand on one of the sacks; this soldier was to be the Unknown Warrior.  The remaining three sets of bones were taken away and buried nearby.

The bones of the selected soldier were placed in a coffin made from an oak tree from Hampton Court Palace.  The coffin was then taken to a railway carriage, known as the Edith Cavell* van, and guarded by French soldiers.  A Union Flag covered the coffin.  On the coffin were the words;

A British Warrior who fell in the Great War 1914-1918 for King and Country.

*Edith Cavell was a British nurse executed by the Germans in 1915 for helping injured British soldiers escape from the German-occupied parts of Belgium.  As a nurse, she treated not just wounded British and French soldiers, but also wounded German soldiers.  The carriage that brought her body back to Britain was named the Edith Cavell van.

The train carrying the Unknown Warrior travelled through Northern France to the French port of Boulogne where it went on a horse drawn carriage accompanied by thousands of French people, a band of the French cavarly and a division of French soldiers to the British warship HMS Verdun.  Crossing the English Channel, HMS Verdun was accompanied by six destroyers to Dover.  The coffin then went by train to to London.  Throughout the journey, both in France and Britain, the stations and docks were  lined by many thousands of people paying their respects.

The grave is filled with 100 barrels of soil from the Western Front and the black marble tablet came from Belgium.

Because there was no record of where this soldier was found or any other identifying feature, for those families for whom there is no grave on the Western Front, there is the possibility that the Unknown Warrior may be their father, husband or son.

In 1921, the Unknown Warrior was given the United States of America’s highest military medal, the Medal of Honour.

As is customary, in Royal weddings, the bridal bouquet is placed on the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior.

The Tomb of the Unknown Warrior, buried in Westminster Abbey among Kings and Queens, is one of the most famous tombs in the world.

The Tomb of the Unknown Warrior, Westminster Abbey (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

The Tomb of the Unknown Warrior, Westminster Abbey (© Commonwealth War Graves Commission)

Beneath this stone rests the body
Of a British warrior
Unknown by name or rank
Brought from France to lie among
The most illustrious of the land
And buried here on Armistice Day
11 Nov: 1920, in the presence of
His Majesty King George V
His Ministers of State
The Chiefs of his forces
And a vast concourse of the nation
Thus are commemorated the many
Multitudes who during the Great
War of 1914 – 1918 gave the most that
Man can give life itself
For God
For King and country
For loved ones home and empire
For the sacred cause of justice and
The freedom of the world
They buried him among the kings because he
Had done good toward God and toward
His house

 

 

School Project

Apart from a whole-school assembly and a photographic display of the trip, our project was to visit the War Memorial in Emsworth, which listed those who have died in the service of our country from WW1 to the present day  to find out the addresses of where the WW1 soldiers once lived and write to the present occupants to say that a fallen soldier of WW1 once lived at their address.

 

The Emsworth War Memorial

The Emsworth War Memorial

To see a complete list of all those who have sacrificed their lives and are remembered on the Emsworth War Memorial’s ‘ Roll of Honour’, please click the link below.

Emsworth Memorial Garden - Roll of Honour

Emsworth Memorial Garden – Roll of Honour

 

Emsworth Memorial Garden

Emsworth Memorial Garden (© Friends of Emsworth Memorial Garden)

 

Emsworth Memorial Garden (© Friends of Emsworth Memorial Garden)

Emsworth Memorial Garden (© Friends of Emsworth Memorial Garden)